A Letter to Our Partners

Dear Friends and Partners of the Williamsburg Health Foundation,

With the growing number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Greater Williamsburg, we want to share a couple of important thoughts with you.

WHF has not determined any one course of action in response to the coronavirus.  As many resources – federal, state, and local – will be brought to bear on this crisis, we are learning every day about what resources will come into the community and what resources need to be found within the community.

As you are probably aware, the spread in the Peninsula Health District, which is our health district, has been among the highest in Virginia.  We must all continue to listen to local news and information to understand how the situation is evolving. We encourage you to visit the Governor’s website at https://www.governor.virginia.gov/  for news and information.

As of 3/17/20, I have instructed all WHF staff to work from home. This to both protect our staff and to contribute to the health of Greater Williamsburg by reducing the spread of the virus. Should you need to email anyone on our staff, please visit williamsburghealthfoundation.org/staff.

Although we are not physically in the office, we are all working and can be reached by email and phone. We have good systems in place and will continue business as usual, just in separate locations.

We live in a community with many outstanding organizations doing great work.  I am deeply impressed by the engagement I have already seen from our schools and local nonprofit agencies to address short term needs like hunger. This community always comes together in a productive, meaningful way in times of crisis.

Please be in touch with us so we understand the challenges you are facing. We know COVID-19 will likely affect a grantee’s ability to carry out work you had planned to do. We offer our flexibility during this time and encourage you to be in touch with our staff if you have concerns.

Please stay well and be in touch!

Carol L. Sale, RN, MSN

President and CEO

2020 Status of Health in Greater Williamsburg

This report collects and analyzes publicly available, community-level health related data. The goal of the report is to transform the data into actionable knowledge. It is our hope that the report will facilitate community dialogue, inform health and human service providers and decision makers, and support collaborative approaches that will address challenges, gaps and opportunities. In many cases, the findings highlight disparities in health outcomes among different segments of our community. The report is produced biennially by WHF Senior Program Officer, Paulette Parker. This version includes an expanded section on the impact of the Social Determinants of Health.

To view the report, click here

WHF Annual Awards 2019

Williamsburg Health Foundation’s 2019 Annual Awards breakfast highlighted the impact of Medicaid Expansion in Greater Williamsburg.

WHF 2019 Annual Awards Breakfast Press Release

Main Image Caption:

Back row, left to right: Lou F. Rossiter, Chair, WHF Board of Trustees; S. Duke Storen, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Social Services; Rick Verilla, Director of York-Poquoson Social Services; Clarence A. Wilson, Chair, WHF Annual Awards Committee Chair and Trustee. Front Row: Rebecca Vinroot, Director, Social Services James City County; Carol L. Sale, WHF President and CEO; Wendy Evans, Director, Williamsburg Human Services.

Final Grants for 2019 Announced

On Monday, December 2, 2019, the Williamsburg Health Foundation’s Board of Trustees approved $999,500 in grants to organizations working in the Greater Williamsburg community.

“There is no typical grant for the Williamsburg Health Foundation,” said WHF President and CEO, Carol L. Sale.  “Our grants reflect the health-related needs in our service area.  For example, we have a large older adult population, one generally higher than the rest of Virginia.  We want to be sure older adults who cannot prepare meals for themselves receive nutritious meals.  We want to be sure older adults can get to the doctor.”

“People need healthy food to lead a healthy life,” said Sale, “so the health foundation works supports the delivery of fresh produce and lean meats to local food pantries and into communities through Virginia Peninsula Foodbank’s mobile food pantries with local partners like the Williamsburg House of Mercy.”

Statistics show another big gap in healthcare is the delivery of mental health services.  “We know many adults and children in our community suffer from poor mental health.  We want to support them as much as possible, and our focus is healing families. We work with many fantastic partners such as the College of William & Mary’s graduate program in counseling, Center for Child and Family Services, and Elk Hill which is working with the York County Schools”.

The health foundation also understands the community needs strong agencies to deliver effective programs. This grant cycle the Foundation is “excited to put grant dollars to work to build the long-term success of local nonprofit agencies as organizations,” said Sale.

One ongoing grant supports a director of development position, and another new grant will improve an agency’s financial infrastructure and increase its ability to bill insurance for services.  In addition, a grant was made toward the continued success of the Nonprofit Management Institute run by NetworkPeninsula in partnership with workforce development at Thomas Nelson Community College’s Historic Triangle Campus.  “Through these classes nonprofit board and staff increase their understanding of how to lead a nonprofit and the skills required for leadership.”

The Williamsburg Health Foundation was founded in 1996 with proceeds from the partnership between Sentara Healthcare and the former Williamsburg Community Hospital. The foundation has a vision of “individuals making healthy choices with health opportunity for all.”  Since its inception, the Foundation has granted nearly 84 million dollars to improve the health of the Williamsburg community. For information on grants from the Williamsburg Health Foundation, including how to apply for a grant, visit www.williamsburghealthfoundation.org/grants-center

“As much as the foundation is able to do, there is infinitely more to be done,” said Sale.  “We ask everyone to give, donate, volunteer, and advocate for the many nonprofits in our community.  There is no better time of year to do so.”

For a full list of grants award in the second of two grant cycles for 2019 click here.

2019 Annual Awards Breakfast Highlights the Impact of Medicaid Expansion in Greater Williamsburg

Back row, left to right: Lou F. Rossiter, Chair, WHF Board of Trustees; S. Duke Storen, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Social Services; Rick Verilla, Director of York-Poquoson Social Services; Clarence A. Wilson, Chair, WHF Annual Awards Committee Chair and Trustee. Front Row: Rebecca Vinroot, Director, Social Services James City County; Carol L. Sale, WHF President and CEO; Wendy Evans, Director, Williamsburg Human Services.

WILLIAMSBURG – On October 30, 2019, the Williamsburg Health Foundation hosted over 150 people at its annual awards breakfast to highlight the impact of Medicaid expansion on the community.  The guest speaker was Virginia Department of Social Services Commissioner, S. Duke Storen.  The event also gave special recognition to local Departments of Social Services for their work to enroll residents in health insurance.

“We hope the 2019 annual awards will raise awareness of the importance of the Medicaid program and its positive impact on the lives of our hard-working neighbors,” said Carol L. Sale, President and CEO of the Williamsburg Health Foundation.  Sale noted that 4,200 people in the cities of Williamsburg and Poquoson and the counties of James City and York have  enrolled in Medicaid since expansion.

Commissioner Storen spoke of the state-wide impact of Medicaid expansion in Virginia.  According to the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance (DMAS), statistics as of September 6, 2019 show more than 314,000 individuals are newly enrolled in Medicaid; and, of those, more than 256,000 have seen a primary care provider.  The number of newly enrolled individuals seen for chronic conditions include: Cancer (3,293); Diabetes (20,000); Hypertension (32,000); Serious Mental Illness (30,000); Heart Disease (11,000).

In a video featured at the breakfast, Greater Williamsburg Medicaid recipients, social workers, and healthcare executives all explained the impact of Medicaid expansion from their personal and professional perspectives.

Beth Shisler, a Williamsburg-area mom and medical aide who suffered with debilitating migraines, used her newly acquired Medicaid to see physician specialists. “I found out I was allergic to gluten and soy and yeast,” she said. With a diagnosis and maintenance medications, Shisler can now control her migraines. “I’m more capable, and so much happier,” she said.

Lynette Diaz, a social worker with James City County noted “when individuals are able to receive the care that they need, there’s less incidence of a ripple effect of other needs.  What we see in our work, is that if the physical health and the mental health is being addressed it lays the foundation to be able to address things like employment and housing stability.”

Speaking about new Medicaid recipients, Mary Slade, RN, a home-visiting nurse with the City of Williamsburg pointed out that if parents have access to healthcare “feel better, they have greater energy to take care of their children.  The children are sick less, the children go to school more, and they get to participate in outside activities.  It just creates a more vibrant community for everyone.”

The Williamsburg Health Foundation serves the cities of Williamsburg and Poquoson and the counties of York and James City.  The Foundation has a corpus of 121 million dollars and distributes an average of five million dollars annually.  The Foundation also works with multiple partners to reach its vision of “individuals making healthy choices in a community with health opportunity for all.” For more information about the Williamsburg Health Foundation, visit its website at WilliamsburgHealthFoundation.org. To watch the video shared at the annual awards event, visit youtube.com/user/WburgCommunityHealth

Foundation Center by Candid. Training in Williamsburg

Wednesday September 25, 2019

9:30am-12:30pm – Introduction to Proposal Writing and Project Budgets

Are you new to proposal writing or want a quick refresher? If so, you don’t want to miss one Candid’s most popular classes! In this interactive workshop, you will learn the basics of writing and submitting a project proposal and budget. We will cover:

• The basic elements of a proposal

• The “do’s” and “don’ts” of writing and submitting a proposal

• How to follow up whether the answer is yes or no

• The basic components of a project budget including income and expenses

• How to estimate the realistic cost of a project

• What other financial documents you may also need to submit with your proposal

1:30-4:30pm – Introduction to Finding Grants and Fundraising Planning

Discover what funders are looking for in nonprofits seeking grants and how to find potential funders. You will learn the 10 most important things you need to know about finding grants and how to diversify your organization’s funding streams including:

• Who funds nonprofits and what are their motivations

• What funders really want to know about the organizations they are interested in funding

• How to identify potential funders and make the first approach

• How to develop a case statement for support

• How to set fundraising goals and prepare a fundraising calendar

Thursday, September 26th

9:30-11:30am – Your Board and Fundraising

Having challenges getting your board involved in fundraising? This class will cover:

  • What characteristics make up an effective board and what are some typical board roles and responsibilities?
  • What are some of the specific ways board members can become involved with fundraising?
  • What are the common reasons board member may use to avoid fundraising and how do you overcome these concerns?
  • How do you attract and orient board members and instill a commitment to fundraising?

To enroll, visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CandidinWilliamsburg

2019 June Grants Awarded

On Monday, June 3, 2019, the Williamsburg Health Foundation’s Board of Trustees approved over 3.6 million dollars in grants to provide organizations in Greater Williamsburg the resources they need to improve the health and well-being of people in Greater Williamsburg.

            “Our goal is to promote health in the community,” said President and CEO, Carol L. Sale.  “We do so in three strategic areas. The first is increasing opportunities for health and well-being over a lifetime. The second is improving access to healthcare. The third is strengthening the organizations we support.”

            “Our first grant round is always our largest,” said Sale. Over $1.4 million dollars are directed to support health and well-being in the community. This includes programs especially for children, such as the School Health Initiative Project (SHIP); grants to Child Development Resources; and the Child Health Initiative.

            “We are pleased with the growth and success of the Child Health Initiative, one of our newest programs, which expanded this past year,” said Sale.  Piloted in the City of Williamsburg, the program is now also in James City County. This program meets the needs of multiple generations of one family at one time. “Families face complex challenges; all of which affect the health of the child,” said Sale.

            Sale also explained that the Foundation is unwavering in its support of access to healthcare and local safety net clinics: Olde Towne Medical and Dental Center, Gloucester Mathews Care Clinic, Lackey Clinic, and Angels of Mercy Clinic.  “Medicaid expansion is shifting the people served by the safety net clinics, but even after expansion, economists estimate 323,000 individuals under age 65 will be without health insurance,” said Sale.  This number includes households earning between 139% to 300% of the Federal Poverty Level, which varies by household size. Over $2 million in Foundation grants went to the support the health care needs of the most vulnerable members of the community, including medical, dental, behavioral, and oral health services and prescription medications.

            In its third goal area of strengthening the agencies influencing health in the area, the Foundation is the first in the state to partner with an online platform called Catchafire. Skilled volunteers from around the country are now available to 100 health-related organizations to help with over 120 projects such as visual brand identity, compensation surveys,  budgeting, employee handbooks, and grant writing.“ Anyone can apply to volunteer their professional skills to make a difference at Catchafire.org,” said Sale.

            Louis Rossiter, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Foundation said: “Greater Williamsburg is so fortunate to have the financial resources of the Williamsburg Health Foundation. Only a handful of communities in Virginia have a foundation devoted to health. But, for every dollar the Foundation distributes, we wish there were fifty dollars more, which is why we ask everyone in the community to continue to support local nonprofit organizations. As an individual, make healthy choices and encourage others to do the same. If you are able, support some of these great local organizations with your time, talent, or treasure.”

            The Williamsburg Health Foundation was founded in 1996 with proceeds from the partnership between Sentara Healthcare and the former Williamsburg Community Hospital. The Foundation has a vision of “individuals making healthy choices with health opportunity for all.”  Since its inception, the Foundation has granted over 85.5 million dollars to improve the health of people living in Greater Williamsburg. For information on grants from the Williamsburg Health Foundation, including how to apply for a grant, visit www.williamsburghealthfoundation.org/grants-center

Newly Elected Class of 2019 Board of Trustees

WILLIAMSBURG — The Williamsburg Health Foundation announces new members and officers for its Board of Trustees.  New board members include:

Kelli Mansel-Arbuckle, MEd

Ms. Mansel-Arbuckle retired as Human Resources Director from Colonial Williamsburg.  She has a Masters Degree in counseling from William & Mary.  She has volunteered with many local nonprofit agencies and served on the board of Literacy for Life, a grantee of the Foundation. 

Doug Myers, MBA

Mr. Myers, a Portfolio Management Director at Morgan Stanley, returns to the Williamsburg Health Foundation board of trustees after a three-year hiatus He previously served with distinction, including a term as chair of the board. 

Stephen Staples, PhD

Dr. Staples retired in 2018 from his position as Virginia’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction.  He served for 16 years as the superintendent of York County Schools.  He is a part-time Executive Professor at the The College of William & Mary. 

Alfred “Al” Woods, MBA

Mr. Woods has provided leadership to local nonprofit boards including Olde Towne Medical and Dental Clinic and Williamsburg Community Foundation.  He currently serves on the boards of The Williamsburg Landing and WJCC Schools Foundation.  In addition to his nonprofit board service, he is Chairman of the Aegion Corporation. 

“We are delighted to have these new trustees who bring with them a diversity of skills and a shared commitment to our community,” says Carol L. Sale, president and CEO of the Foundation.

2019 Officers Williamsburg Health Foundation Board of Trustees

Chair:                          Louis F. Rossiter

Vice-Chair:                Jackson “Jack” C. Tuttle, II

Treasurer:                 Marshall N. Warner

Secretary:                  Carol L. Sale

Final Grants for 2018 Announced

On December 3, 2018, the Williamsburg Health Foundation’s Board of Trustees met and approved over one million dollars in grants to provide individuals in Greater Williamsburg with increased opportunity to lead healthy lives.

“The opportunity to live a healthy life is not evenly distributed to all,” said Carol Sale, President and CEO of the Williamsburg Health Foundation.  “A major thrust of the Foundation’s work for many years has been to look at upstream determinants of health and try to level the playing field so everyone in our community can have a chance to lead a healthier life for the long term. In this, the second of two grant rounds for 2018, there are strong examples of this work.”

Grants to the Arc of Williamsburg for adult fitness classes and another to the One Child Center for Autism’s monthly Kids’ Night held at the Williamsburg Indoor Sports Complex help to support special opportunities for active living for individuals with learning differences and with disabilities of all ages. “People with intellectual and or developmental disabilities are at significantly greater risk than the population at large for obesity and related health problems,” said Sale.

“Our largest grant for wellness promotion each year is the School Health Investment Program, or SHIP,” said Sale.  “But these two grants illustrate how some members of our community face different and more complex challenges in living a healthy life.”

In this grant round, the largest grant is to Olde Towne Medical and Dental Center. “This has been a consistent grant for many years.” said Sale. “We appreciate all Olde Towne and our other local safety net clinics have done to see both insured and uninsured patients.”

“The expansion of Medicaid in Virginia will mean many changes and challenges for all safety-net clinics in the future. Medicaid reimbursement does not typically cover the cost of treating a patient. We know there will still be a profound need for support for the local clinics, and we hope that donors and longtime supporters will understand this as well.”

“At the Foundation, we always remind people that we all have a role to play in making ours a healthier community,” said Sale.  “Be kind, help someone who needs you, or support a local organization. It all goes a long way towards making ours a healthy community. ”

The Williamsburg Health Foundation was founded in 1996 with proceeds from the partnership between Sentara Healthcare and the former Williamsburg Community Hospital.  Since its inception, the Foundation has granted nearly 80 million dollars to improve the health of the Williamsburg community. For information on grants from the Williamsburg Health Foundation, including how to apply for a grant,visit www.williamsburghealthfoundation.org/grants-center.

Grants Approved by WHF Board of Trustees on December 3, 2018
Name Project Title Grant Amount
The Arc of Greater Williamsburg Fitness Program $25,000
Center for Child and Family Services Child and Family Connection’s Violence Prevention and Intervention Program (VPIP) $35,000
Colonial Behavioral Health Advancing Opioid-Addiction Treatment $40,000
Community Housing Partners Building Healthy Communities $45,000
The Doorways Basic Operating Support $12,000
Elk Hill Farm, Inc. Elk Hill’s School-Based Mental Health Program $20,000
Grove Christian Outreach Center Children’s Summer Lunch Program $5,000
New Horizons Family Counseling Center Youth and Family Counseling Program $100,000
Olde Towne Medical & Dental Center Basic Operating Support $450,000
Olde Towne Medical & Dental Center Improving Diabetic Self-Management through Health Coaching $30,000
One Child Center for Autism Kids’ Night $15,000
Peninsula Agency on Aging PAA RIDES Program $110,000
Peninsula Agency on Aging Nutritious Noontime Meals $50,000
Postpartum Support Virginia, Inc. Healthy Mother, Healthy Family $8,000
Virginia Peninsula Foodbank Mobile Food Pantry: Fresh Produce Program $20,000
Williamsburg Area Faith in Action Support for Development Director $42,000
Williamsburg Soccer Foundation Virginia Legacy Soccer Club Community Partnership Program $20,000
TOTAL: $1,027,000